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My Return HF Hiking Holiday Based In St Ives In Cornwall England

HF Hiking Holiday Based In St Ives In Cornwall

My return HF Hiking Holiday Based In St Ives In Cornwall with Holiday Fellowship (HF) Holidays was again a fabulous time for me.

Last year we did itinerary 2 and had such a great experience that we decided to do itinerary 1 this year.

We had a choice of three day hikes each day on this hiking holiday. Itinerary 1 lists the choices of day hiking we had on each day.

Supplemental Hiking lists the extra day hiking choices we had during the week.

Our accommodation was named “Chy Morvah”, “Chy” meaning “House” and “Morvah” meaning “by the sea”.

St Ives In Cornwall Hiking Holiday Video

Return HF Hiking Holiday St Ives In Cornwall

This video slideshow shows some highlights from Return HF Hiking Holiday St Ives In Cornwall.

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St Ives In Cornwall Hiking Holiday Schedule

The schedule for our 6 day hiking holiday with HF Holidays was:

  • Arrival Day 0 – Saturday – We arrived abou 3pm on Saturday afternoon. We settled in to our room and had afternoon tea with the Holiday Leaders and other guests. There was a talk by the walk leaders about the hiking during the week. There was an opportunity to walk around St Ives, taking in the harbour and surfing beach before sitting down for our evening meal. After our meal we retired to the lounge for a chat with othe guests, some jokes from the walk leaders and a quiz. Finally we went to bed so we were fresh for the hiking next day.
  • Transportation By Coach – Except for of day 1, when we hiked from our accommodation, we were tranported by coach to and from the hiking locations. The cost of coach transport to and from the hiking locations was included in the cost of our hiking holiday.
  • Hiking Days – The format of a hiking day was: breakfast in the dinning room; an option from a Easy, Medium or Harder hiking trips; evening meal in the dinning room; coffee in the lounge; and a drink and chat together with evening entertainment in either the lounge or the ballroom:
    • Day 1 – Sunday – The hike we chose to do on the first day of hiking was the harder option – Trencrom Hill, Lelant and Carbis Bay which was a distance of 10 miles and short ascents totalling 1300 feet. After dinner and coffee the evening entertainment was a talk on Cornwall by a local expert.
    • Day 2 – Monday – The second day we chose another harder option – Botallack, Cape Cornwall, Sennen Cove and Land’s End which was a distance of 8.25 miles and short ascents totalling 1300 feet. Following dinner and coffee there was some country dancing in the ballroom led by one of the walk leaders.
    • Day 3 – Tuesday – For the third day of hiking we again chose the harder option. However, the The itinerary was changed to a harder option from the Supplemental Hiking – Rinsey Head, Trewarvas and St Michael’s Mount, a distance of 9.75 miles and ascents totalling 1075 feet. This was to accomodate an injury to one of the walk leaders and to allow for the possibility of handing over the harder hiking group to the medium hiking group part way through the hike. The injured leader begun the harder hike and handed his group over to the medium hiking group leader at a pre-arranged point along the hike. The evening meal today was buffet style. The entertainment was a music version of Balderdash, a kind of “Call My Bluff” for those who remember it.
    • Day 4 – Wednesday – Our hiking holiday included a free day on Wednesday, giving us the opportunity to explore the local area independently or relax in the comfort of our accommodation. Some people went on an organised coach trip to “The Eden Project”. We decided to do the “Medium walk from Day 2 of Itinerary 2”, a 7.5 mile circular hiking trip with short ascents totalling 950 feet which you can find on my article about my first hiking holiday to St. Ives with HF Holidays. On our return to St Ives we visited one of the tea shops and had afternoon tea. After eating our evening meal and having coffee in the lounge, we were left to our own devices to entertain ourselves with board games, cards, or simply having a chat and a drink with fellow hikers.
    • Day 5 – Thursday – On day 5 we chose another harder option – Coastline from Treryn Dinas to Mousehole with a distance of 9 miles and ascents totalling 1625 feet. This was a tough day with the steep ascents. After our evening meal and coffee there were a series of team quizzes held by the holiday leaders. I was useless and our team did not win.
    • Day 6 – Friday – Finally on day 6, you guessed it, we chose the harder option – Lizard coastline – Poltesco, Carleon, Cadgwith, Polpeor and Kynance Cove over 11.25 miles with a total ascent of 1200 feet. Again, this was a tough day. After our last supper and coffee in the lounge, the last night of entertainment was a series of performances by the holiday leaders and guests in the Ballroom. Our contribution to the entertainment was to perform a Ceroc dance to a Tina Arena track, “Now I Can Dance”.

Information on HF Holidays, Cornwall & St. Ives

For more information on HF Holidays, St. Ives and Cornwall seen my article about my first hiking holiday to St. Ives with HF Holidays

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St. Ives Cornwall 2010 Day Hiking

If you wish to see a more detailed video about the day hiking of each day of this HF Hiking Holiday Based In St Ives In Cornwall then follow the appropriate links below:

  1. Day 1 – Sun – Circular Day Hiking St Ives To Carbis Bay
  2. Day 2 – Mon – Day Hiking Botallack To Lands End
  3. Day 3 – Tue – Day Hiking Rinsey Head To St Michael’s Mount
  4. Day 4 – Wed – Circular Day Hiking St Ives To River Cove
  5. Day 5 – Thu – Day Hiking Treryn Dinas To Mousehole
  6. Day 6 – Fri – Circular Day Hiking The Lizard Via Poltesco And Kynance Cove

Our Hiking Holiday Itinerary – Itinerary 1

  • Day 0: Arrival Day

    • On the first evening, Holiday Leaders explain more about the week’s hiking and there is plenty of time to meet fellow hikers.
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  • Day 1: Fields and coast, south and east of St Ives

    • Easier Walk – Knill’s Monument, Carrack Gladden and Carbis Bay – SW 517401
      5 miles and short ascents totalling 850 feet.

      Starting from Chy Morvah we walk across fields and along ancient footpaths, uphill through woods to Knill’s Monument overlooking St Ives Bay. John Knill, collector of customs and one-time mayor of St Ives, erected the monument in 1792 intending to be buried there. Owing to difficulties over consecration this did not happen but he left a legacy to provide for ten girls to dance round the monument on St James’ Day every fifth year. We continue through more woods and by minor roads towards Carbis Bay; we then make a circuit round Carrack Gladden to have a view of Porth Kidney Sands before descending to Carbis Bay beach, popular for swimming in summer. The return to Chy Morvah is made using the coast path and the Hain Walk down to Porthminster beach below Chy Morvah. The paths are good throughout.
    • Medium Walk – Knill’s Monument, Lelant and Carbis Bay – SW 517401
      7.5 miles and short ascents totalling 1000 feet.

      We begin our walk through fields and woods to Knill’s Monument overlooking St Ives Bay. John Knill, collector of customs and one-time Mayor of St Ives, erected the monument intending to be buried there, but, owing to difficulties over consecration, was not. He left a legacy to provide for ten girls to dance round the monument on St James’ Day every fifth year. We continue through fields and by minor roads down to Carbis Bay and alongside the golf course to Lelant church. The return to Chy Morvah is made using the coast path over Carrack Gladden into Carbis Bay then up to the Hain Walk and St Ives. The paths are good throughout.
    • Harder Walk – Trencrom Hill, Lelant and Carbis Bay – SW 517401
      10 miles and short ascents totalling 1300 feet.

      Starting from Chy Morvah, we walk through fields and woods to Knill’s Monument and then to Trencrom Hill, an early Iron Age fort overlooking a wide stretch of country, situated on a natural rampart of the Land’s End peninsula. We then continue alongside the Hayle River to Lelant church. We return to Chy Morvah by the coast path over Carrack Gladden and down to Carbis Bay. A varied walk showing the farmlands, coast paths over dunes (or towans) and headlands east of St Ives. The paths are good throughout but muddy patches are likely after wet weather. Use has to be made of short lengths of minor roads.
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  • Day 2: Heritage area on the north west coast

    • Easier Walk – St Just, Whitesand Bay to Land’s End – SW 370313
      5.5 miles and two ascents totalling 650 feet.

      After viewing the (much photographed) Crowns Mine buildings near Botallack, we leave the coach at St Just where the medieval church, overlooking the wide town square, is worth visiting. Leaving St Just along lanes towards the Cot Valley, we cross farmland to Carn Aire perched above Whitesand Bay. After a short descent, time is spent at Whitesand Bay and exploring Sennen Cove. The walk along the granite cliffs to Land’s End itself is a great contrast – the paths are easy once the initial climb has been accomplished. The opportunity can be taken to visit the exhibitions at Land’s End (additional charge).
    • Medium Walk – St Just, Carn Ballowall and Land’s End – SW 370313
      7 miles and short ascents totalling 875 feet.

      After viewing the Crowns Mine engine houses perched dramatically above the sea near Botallack, we leave the coach at St Just, the centre for mining in Penwith. The medieval church, overlooking the wide town square, is worth visiting. Leaving St Just along minor roads we walk toward Carn Ballowall, an ancient burial chamber unlike any other in Britain. The coast path is joined and we descend to the quiet Cot Valley and Porth Nanven, continuing along the coast path to the tranquil Nanquidno Valley for lunch. The cliff paths here are frequently on grass, with the occasional boulder to scramble over or round. The fine long beach of Whitesand Bay is seen in the distance with the buildings of Sennen Cove at the far end. After tea (and possibly a swim) the route starts the final ascent to the granite cliffs at Land’s End and the coach back to St Ives.
    • Harder Walk – Botallack, Cape Cornwall, Sennen Cove and Land’s End – SW 368330
      8.25 miles and short ascents totalling 1300 feet.

      Leaving the coach at Botallack, we view the Crowns Mine engine houses perched dramatically on the cliff edge. We then walk along the coast path towards Cape Cornwall and onwards along the cliffs past a Neolithic chamber tomb. The cliff paths here are frequently on grass, with the occasional boulder to scramble over or round. The fine long beach of Whitesand Bay is seen in the distance with the buildings of Sennen Cove at the far end. After tea (and possibly a swim) we start the final ascent to the granite cliffs at Land’s End and the coach back to St Ives. A varied walk showing the contrast between a fishing cove and the abandoned tin mines, with fine coastal scenery as well.
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  • Day 3: Mining, shipwrecks and smuggling on the Lizard

    • Easier Walk – Praa Sands to St Michael’s Mount – SW 576282
      6.25 miles and ascents totalling 775 feet.

      We begin our walk at Praa Sands with its attractive beach and cafes and take the undulating coastal path above Kenneggy Sands & Prussia Cove to Cudden Point where we receive stunning views of St Michael’s Mount. We then continue with beautiful coastal walking to the attractive village of Perranuthnoe where we will have lunch. The afternoon takes us into Marazion where there is a full range of facilities and the opportunity (time, tides and weather permitting) for a swim or a stroll along the causeway to the Mount. Good cliff paths – undulating but not too steep.
    • Medium Walk – Rinsey Head to St Michael’s Mount – SW 601280
      8.5 miles and ascents totalling 900 feet.

      Using minor roads, we head for the hamlet of Rinsey and the coast at Rinsey Head. We explore the mine buildings of Wheal Prosper before joining the South West Coast Path to Praa Sands, either walking along the mile-long beach or through a private estate and over sand dunes. We continue on the coastal path above Kenneggy Sands and Prussia Cove to Cudden Point. St Michael’s Mount and Marazion are reached via the attractive village of Perranuthnoe. Good cliff paths – undulating but not too steep.
    • Harder Walk – Porthleven to St Michael’s Mount – SW 627259
      11 miles and ascents totalling 1575 feet.

      We leave the coach at the harbour in Porthleven and join the South West Coast Path for a walk along outstanding coastline as it undulates (quite steeply at times) to Trewarvas Head. Here we have first views of the dramatic mine buildings of Wheal Trewarvas. We walk round the mine buildings to Wheal Prosper and Rinsey Head where we descend to the attractive beach at Praa Sands and then continue on the coastal path above Kenneggy Sands and Prussia Cove to Cud den Point. St Michael’s Mount and Marazion are reached via the attractive village of Perranuthnoe. Good cliff paths – undulating and steep at times.
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  • Day 4: No organised walks

    • This day is spent free from organised hiking. It allows a chance to explore St. Ives and Cornwall independently or just relax around Chy Morvah and its grounds.
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  • Day 5: A Bronze Age experience

    • Easier Walk – Merry Maidens, Lamorna Cove and coast path to Mousehole – SW 432245
      5.75 miles and short ascents totalling 400 feet.

      We leave the coach alongside the Bronze Age stone circle known as the Merry Maidens. Legend says that 19 maidens and 2 pipers (nearby standing stones) were turned to stone for dancing on the sabbath! Further archaeological sites are nearby. We then follow a path on farmland and minor roads to Lamorna Cove. We continue along the coast path to Raginnis Hill overlooking Mousehole. A contouring walk brings us to Paul, the “churchtown” of Mousehole where valuable possessions were stored until the 17th century. Scorch marks are still visible in the church from the burning and plundering by the Spaniards in 1595. We then go down the hill to Mousehole. The walk may be curtailed at Raginnis Hill, descending directly into Mousehole to explore the maze of twisting cobbled streets. The paths vary considerably – from good to stony, with some mud after wet weather.
    • Medium Walk – Coastline from St Loy to Mousehole – SW 418238
      6.75 miles and short ascents totalling 1075 feet.

      After viewing the Merry Maidens stone circle, the coach takes us to the start of the path through woods down to the beach at St Loy and a completely unspoilt part of the coast path. The area around St Loy is almost tropical in its lushness. We pass Tater Du lighthouse (built in 1965) before descending to Lamorna Cove, around the rocky headland. We continue along the coast path to Raginnis Hill overlooking Mousehole. A contouring walk brings us to Paul, the “churchtown” of Mousehole where valuable possessions were stored until the 17th century. Scorch marks are still visible in the church from the burning and plundering by the Spaniards in 1595. We then go down the hill to Mousehole. The walk may be curtailed at Raginnis Hill, descending directly into Mousehole to explore the maze of twisting cobbled streets. The paths vary considerably – from good to stony, with occasional boulders and some mud after wet weather.
    • Harder Walk – Coastline from Treryn Dinas to Mousehole – SW 394232
      9 miles and ascents totalling 1625 feet.

      After viewing the Merry Maidens stone circle, we leave the coach at the junction of the 83315 and the road to Treen. We walk up the lane to the village, past the Logan Rock Inn to the Iron Age castle of Treryn Dinas. A diversion will be made to the headland to view the well-known Logan Rock. Returning to the coast path we turn eastward to Pen berth Cove and St Loy. The coast path brings us around the rocky headland to Lamorna Cove, a small fishing village, and a haven for sub-aqua enthusiasts. We continue through Kemyel Crease Nature Reserve to reach Mousehole via the old “churchtown” of Paul. This walk may be curtailed by omitting Paul. Paths are varied, good in places, with rocky and stony stretches and some mud after rain.
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  • Day 6: Exploring the most southerly area of England

    • Easier Walk – Lizard coastline – Church Cove to Kynance Cove – SW 703126
      5.5 miles and short ascents totalling 425 feet.

      Leaving the coach at Lizard Green, we walk past Landewednack church, the most southerly church in England, down to the coast at Church Cove. We then follow the coast path past Polpeor Cove, the most southerly point in England, round Lizard Point, to Kynance Cove, possibly going down to the beach for a swim (200 feet down and back up). We then return to Lizard Green along an ancient Cornish “hedge” footpath. This is a path between two fields on top of a wide (but not very high) pair of stone walls filled in with soil. The cliff paths are on easy ground, mostly on turf.
    • Medium Walk – Mullion, Lizard coastline, Polurrian Cove, Kynance Cove and Lizard Green – SW 682190
      7.75 miles and short ascents totalling 875 feet. The extension is an extra 1.5 miles and 275 feet of ascent.

      We leave the coach just outside Mullion and make a quick visit to the church. It contains a restored Cornish rood screen and some old oak seats with curious and interesting carving on the bench ends. We take a path out of the village down to Polurrian Cove, and walk along the coast path up and over to the scenic and much photographed Mullion Cove. The steep climb out of the cove is followed by an easy, well defined and superb cliff path to the scenic and famous Kynance Cove, passing several small rocky coves en route. A swim is possible here, followed by a short walk to Uzard Green along an ancient Cornish “hedge” footpath. The walk can be extended by continuing along the cliffs from Kynance Cove round Lizard Point to Polpeor Cove, the most southerly point in England, before walking” up to Lizard Green. The cliff paths are on easy ground, mostly on turf.
    • Harder Walk – Lizard coastline – Poltesco, Carleon, Cadgwith, Polpeor and Kynance Cove – SW 703126
      11.25 miles with a total ascent of 1200 feet.

      From Lizard Green a short road walk brings us to Landewednack church, the most southerly church in England. We then walk northwards across fields to Poltesco and Carleon Cove. Turning south, after joining the coast path, we pass through Cadgwith, then past two collapsed caves called the Devil’s Frying Pan and the Lion’s Den on the way to Lizard Point. Continuing on the coast path, we reach Kynance Cove. From the car park at the top we use tracks and field paths, with an ancient Cornish “hedge” footpath, to reach Lizard Green and the coach. Good field and cliff paths with some stony sections.

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Supplemental Hiking

When the number of hikers attending this holiday are high then additional hikes may be chosen from a supplementary section which can be seen in my article about my first trip to St. Ives with HF Holidays.

The supplemental hikes may also be used to replace a hike when the weather is too bad or to account for the variety of abilities in the hiking group.

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